The menthol-cool stylings of CoatedAcrobat.

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meanplastic:

me about to do a powerpoint presentation

meanplastic:

me about to do a powerpoint presentation

(Source: bitchyblackbarbie)

I miss this GaGa.

(Source: hegodamask)

incisiontime:

cranquis:

blue-lights-and-tea:

Clues to help you in making a diagnosis.

This is handy!

handy…i see what you did there.

incisiontime:

cranquis:

blue-lights-and-tea:

Clues to help you in making a diagnosis.

This is handy!

handy…i see what you did there.

polysyndetons:

sandandglass:

Anderson Cooper speaks to Texas State Representative Bryan Hughes, Republican Party. 

keep that creepy smile 6 billion feet away from me

belindapendragon:

wavebuilders:

jespercieply:

bootyscientist:

i promise to reblog this every time it shows up on my dash

What does this even mean idgi

In America we got EBT aka food stamps it’s a government assistance thing and white people think that the minorities are the ones who are the primary consumers of this government assistance but this here photograph is proving that that notion is wrong!

^^^The bolded…

belindapendragon:

wavebuilders:

jespercieply:

bootyscientist:

i promise to reblog this every time it shows up on my dash

What does this even mean idgi

In America we got EBT aka food stamps it’s a government assistance thing and white people think that the minorities are the ones who are the primary consumers of this government assistance but this here photograph is proving that that notion is wrong!

^^^The bolded…

(Source: totallynotablogger)

(Source: ivanv)

Jun 7

thenotquitedoctor:

ninjatengu:

(via I Don’t Know - Med School Parody of “Let It Go” from Frozen)

As far as med school parodies go, this is pretty good!

Love this! Some humor for the M3s out there.

(Source: youtube.com)

Jun 2
mediclopedia:

Something that I have difficulty keeping up with is women’s health. The laws are always changing and the extreme opinions that people have always confuse me. 
Here are two very hot topics I ran into and wanted everyone’s thoughts on it!
1. Tennessee actually recently became the first state that will start jailing women for having children born with harm due to their use of illegal drugs pregnancy. Personally I believe this is good practice and it will help set a standard for future generations. However, there are many opponents, including women’s rights groups and other minority groups. 

Opponents of the new law share a concern that a lack of access to health care and treatment facilities will result in the disproportionate targeting and jailing of poor mothers and mothers of color, particularly in rural districts throughout the state.

2. Here is another one about women having kids later and later. We have this magic number (40) where pregnancy becomes more complicated. So when women over 35 having children increases, it raises a red flag in our community. This raises interesting opinions being traced back to an innate sexism in society, why women must choose between a career and a healthy motherhood and whether  interventions to make both possible are ethical or not. 
Anyways… I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts regarding these two topics! Thanks everyone for participating!

mediclopedia:

Something that I have difficulty keeping up with is women’s health. The laws are always changing and the extreme opinions that people have always confuse me. 

Here are two very hot topics I ran into and wanted everyone’s thoughts on it!

1. Tennessee actually recently became the first state that will start jailing women for having children born with harm due to their use of illegal drugs pregnancy. Personally I believe this is good practice and it will help set a standard for future generations. However, there are many opponents, including women’s rights groups and other minority groups. 

Opponents of the new law share a concern that a lack of access to health care and treatment facilities will result in the disproportionate targeting and jailing of poor mothers and mothers of color, particularly in rural districts throughout the state.

2. Here is another one about women having kids later and later. We have this magic number (40) where pregnancy becomes more complicated. So when women over 35 having children increases, it raises a red flag in our community. This raises interesting opinions being traced back to an innate sexism in society, why women must choose between a career and a healthy motherhood and whether  interventions to make both possible are ethical or not. 

Anyways… I’d love to hear everyone’s thoughts regarding these two topics! Thanks everyone for participating!

Jun 2
ucsdhealthsciences:

Genetic Risk Factor for Premature Birth Found
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a genetic risk factor for premature birth. The risk factor is related to a gene that codes for a protein that the scientists have found helps the body’s immune cells recognize and fight Group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteria.
These bacteria are found in the vagina or lower gastrointestinal tract of approximately 15 to 20 percent of healthy women, but may cause life-threatening infections, such as sepsis or meningitis in newborns, especially those born prematurely.
The study is published online in the May 5, 2014 issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine.
“Pregnant women are universally screened for these bacteria during pregnancy and administered antibiotics intravenously during labor if they test positive to protect the infant from infection,” said Victor Nizet, MD, professor of pediatrics and pharmacy and co-author. “Our research may explain why some women and their infants are at higher risk of acquiring severe GBS infections than others.”
In the study, scientists identified two proteins on fetal membranes of the placenta that are involved in immune function. One of the proteins (known as Siglec-5) binds to the GBS pathogen and suppresses immune response to the microbe, while the other protein (known as Siglec-14) binds to the pathogen, and activates killing of the bacteria. Siglecs are cell surface receptors found typically on immune cells. They recognize (bind) sialic acids - sugar molecules that densely coat our cells.
“We have one protein that tells the body to attack the pathogen and another that tells the body not to attack it,” said Raza Ali, PhD, a project scientist in the Nizet laboratory and the study’s lead author.
Scientists believe that the pair of proteins together helps balance the body’s immune response to pathogens, by directing some antimicrobial response without provoking excessive inflammation.
“Identifying the dual role of these receptors and how they are regulated may provide insight for future treatments against GBS,” Ali said.
Interestingly, the gene for Siglec-14 is missing in some individuals, and the researchers have found that fetuses that lack the Siglec-14 protein are at higher risk of premature birth, likely due to an imbalanced immune response to the bacterial infection.
“We found this association in GBS-positive but not GBS-negative pregnancies, highlighting the importance of GBS-siglec crosstalk on placental membranes,” said Ajit Varki, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Cellular and Molecular Medicine and study co-author.
For reasons not completely understood, GBS infections are not found in any other animals, including chimpanzees, which share 99 percent of human protein sequences. “The expression of the two siglec proteins on the fetal membranes is also unique to humans,” Varki said. “Our study offers intriguing insights into why certain bacterial pathogens may produce uniquely human diseases.”
The scientists believe that identifying the mechanisms of siglec protein action may help in designing therapeutic targets against bacterial infections that are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics and could have important implications for other disorders, such as blood clotting, chronic diseases and HIV infections.
Pictured: Group B Streptococcus bacteria (green) are shown binding to siglec proteins (red) that densely cover the surface of human immune cells (human cell nuclei in blue).

ucsdhealthsciences:

Genetic Risk Factor for Premature Birth Found

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a genetic risk factor for premature birth. The risk factor is related to a gene that codes for a protein that the scientists have found helps the body’s immune cells recognize and fight Group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteria.

These bacteria are found in the vagina or lower gastrointestinal tract of approximately 15 to 20 percent of healthy women, but may cause life-threatening infections, such as sepsis or meningitis in newborns, especially those born prematurely.

The study is published online in the May 5, 2014 issue of the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

“Pregnant women are universally screened for these bacteria during pregnancy and administered antibiotics intravenously during labor if they test positive to protect the infant from infection,” said Victor Nizet, MD, professor of pediatrics and pharmacy and co-author. “Our research may explain why some women and their infants are at higher risk of acquiring severe GBS infections than others.”

In the study, scientists identified two proteins on fetal membranes of the placenta that are involved in immune function. One of the proteins (known as Siglec-5) binds to the GBS pathogen and suppresses immune response to the microbe, while the other protein (known as Siglec-14) binds to the pathogen, and activates killing of the bacteria. Siglecs are cell surface receptors found typically on immune cells. They recognize (bind) sialic acids - sugar molecules that densely coat our cells.

“We have one protein that tells the body to attack the pathogen and another that tells the body not to attack it,” said Raza Ali, PhD, a project scientist in the Nizet laboratory and the study’s lead author.

Scientists believe that the pair of proteins together helps balance the body’s immune response to pathogens, by directing some antimicrobial response without provoking excessive inflammation.

“Identifying the dual role of these receptors and how they are regulated may provide insight for future treatments against GBS,” Ali said.

Interestingly, the gene for Siglec-14 is missing in some individuals, and the researchers have found that fetuses that lack the Siglec-14 protein are at higher risk of premature birth, likely due to an imbalanced immune response to the bacterial infection.

“We found this association in GBS-positive but not GBS-negative pregnancies, highlighting the importance of GBS-siglec crosstalk on placental membranes,” said Ajit Varki, MD, Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Cellular and Molecular Medicine and study co-author.

For reasons not completely understood, GBS infections are not found in any other animals, including chimpanzees, which share 99 percent of human protein sequences. “The expression of the two siglec proteins on the fetal membranes is also unique to humans,” Varki said. “Our study offers intriguing insights into why certain bacterial pathogens may produce uniquely human diseases.”

The scientists believe that identifying the mechanisms of siglec protein action may help in designing therapeutic targets against bacterial infections that are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics and could have important implications for other disorders, such as blood clotting, chronic diseases and HIV infections.

Pictured: Group B Streptococcus bacteria (green) are shown binding to siglec proteins (red) that densely cover the surface of human immune cells (human cell nuclei in blue).

Jun 2
ninjatengu:

Down with Gynoticians!

ninjatengu:

Down with Gynoticians!